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2-Year-Old Child Genius Has IQ of 156

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Elise Tan Roberts may be young, but she’s already accomplished something the majority of us never will: She has become a member of Mensa.

At just 2 years, 4 months and 2 weeks old, Elise has an estimated I.Q. of 156 — putting her in the top 0.2 percent of children her age and qualifying her as the youngest member of the well-known society for smart people..

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Black teen’s unusual talent: Singing Chinese opera

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Tyler Thompson is an unlikely star in the world of Chinese opera.

The black teenager from Oakland has captivated audiences in the U.S. and China with his ability to sing pitch-perfect Mandarin and perform the ancient Chinese art form…

Source:http://www.thegrio.com

Shocking School Achievement Gap for Black Males

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The California Academy of Mathematics and Science in south Los Angeles is one of the top high schools in the country, and senior Danial Ceasar is one of its top students, reports CBS News correspondent Bill Whitaker. He’s got an A average, and he’s ambitious – he wants to be a psychiatrist.

“I’m looking at Berkeley and Stanford as my top schools,” Danial said.

But here’s a troubling sign of the times: achieving, black, male students like Danial are increasingly rare in America’s schools…

Source: http://www.cbsnews.com

IBM Exec: Grades 9 To 14 Model Improves Work Readiness

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Over in U.S. News’s Opinion section, Stan Litow, IBM’s vice president of Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs, lauds a school model being tested in New York City and Chicago that would allow students to graduate from high school with an associate’s degree.

Students at those schools are required to stay in school two extra years. This “9-14” model will allow students to “be exposed to innovative curricula that include the development of workplace skills,” Litow writes…

Source: http://www.usnews.com/news

Master of Mathematics for Teachers

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MATH 692 Reading, Writing and Discovering Proofs (0.25) LEC Course ID: 009357
Objectives: To develop the vocabulary, techniques and analytical skills associated with reading and writing proofs, and to gain practice in formulating conjectures and discovering proofs. Emphasis will be placed on understanding logical structures, recognition and command over common proof techniques, and precision in language. Topics Include: rules of formal logic, truth tables, role of definitions, implications, sets, existential and universal quantifiers, negation and counter-example, proofs by contradiction, proofs using the contrapositive, proofs of uniqueness and induction.
Department Consent Required

MATH 600 Introduction to Mathematical Software for Teachers (0.25) LEC Course ID: 013923
This course exposes students to the technical tools that professional mathematicians use. The software presented in the course will enhance each student’s communication, presentation, visualization, and problem-solving skills. The course will also take a brief look at the history of mathematical communication and its impact on the development of the subject. Department Consent Required

MATH 630 Foundations of Probability (0.50) LEC Course ID: 013831
This course will explore the basic properties of probability focusing on both discrete and continuous random variables. Topics include: Laws of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, mean, variance, generating functions, Markov chains, problem solving, history of probability. Department Consent Required

MATH 640 Number Theory for Teachers (0.50) LEC Course ID: 014212
This course explores the many fascinating properties of the natural numbers. Topics include: the Euclidean algorithm, congruences and modular arithmetic, primitive roots and quadratic residues, sums of squares, multiplicative functions, continued fractions and Diophantine equations, and rational approximations to real numbers. Department Consent Required

MATH 647 Foundations of Calculus I (0.50) LEC Course ID: 013841
This course will explore the foundations of differential calculus, the role of rigor in mathematics, and the use of sophisticated mathematical software. Topics include: A brief primer on logic and proof, axiom of choice and other ideas from set theory, convergence of sequences and the various forms of the completeness axiom for R, detailed study of limits, continuity and the Intermediate Value Theorem, fundamentals of differentiation and the importance of linear approximation, role of the Mean Value Theorem, the nature and existence of extrema, Taylor’s Theorem and polynomial approximation, MAPLE as a tool for discovery. Department Consent Required

MATH 648 Foundations of Calculus II (0.50) LEC Course ID: 013840
This course explores the foundations of integral calculus and the use of series in approximating the basic functions of mathematics. Topics include: Understanding the Riemann Integral and its flaws, the idea of Lebesque, the geometric meaning of the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, numerical integration, numerical series, uniform convergence of functions and the extraordinary nature of power series, Fourier Series. Department Consent Required

MATH 650 Mathematical Modeling with Differential and Difference Equations (0.50) LEC Course ID: 014058
Solving and interpreting differential and difference equations motivated by a variety of systems from the physical and social sciences. Analytical solutions of standard linear and non-linear equations of first and second order; phase portrait analysis; linearization of non-linear systems in the plane. Numerical and graphical solutions using mathematical software. Department Consent Required

MATH 660 Explorations in Geometry (0.50) LEC Course ID: 013833
This course is designed to allow the student to discover fundamental facts about geometry through the interactive use of mathematical software. Possible topics include: An introduction to affine, projective and non-Euclidean geometry, conic sections in projective geometry, inversion in circles, the Theorems of Desargues, Pappas and Pascal. Department Consent Required

MATH 670 Mathematical Connections: Real World Problems in Mathematics I (0.25) LEC Course ID: 013839
This course is intended to give the student insight to an important area of mathematics and how it connects with problems in the real world. Topics: The course is one of four similar courses that will consist of either one six week module, or two three week modules each introducing a separate though possibly related area of mathematics. The emphasis will be on how the mathematics is used in a real world context. Department Consent Required

MATH 671 Mathematical Connections: Real World Problems in Mathematics II (0.25) LEC Course ID: 013838
This course is intended to give the student insight to an important area of mathematics and how it connects with problems in the real world. Topics: The course is one of four similar courses that will consist of either one six week module, or two three week modules each introducing a separate though possibly related area of mathematics. The emphasis will be on how the mathematics is used in a real world context. Department Consent Required

MATH 672 Mathematical Connections: Real World Problems in Mathematics III (0.25) LEC Course ID: 013837
This course is intended to give the student insight to an important area of mathematics and how it connects with problems in the real world. Topics: The course is one of four similar courses that will consist of either one six week module, or two three week modules each introducing a separate though possibly related area of mathematics. The emphasis will be on how the mathematics is used in a real world context. Department Consent Required

MATH 673 Mathematical Connections: Real World Problems in Mathematics IV (0.25) LEC Course ID: 013836
This course is intended to give the student insight to an important area of mathematics and how it connects with problems in the real world. Topics: The course is one of four similar courses that will consist of either one six week module, or two three week modules each introducing a separate though possibly related area of mathematics. The emphasis will be on how the mathematics is used in a real world context. Department Consent Required

MATH 674 Special Topics in Mathematical Connections (0.50) LEC Course ID: 014213
This course is intended to give the student insight to an important area of mathematics and how it connects with problems in the real world. The course will consist of either a one six week module, or two three week modules each introducing a separate though possibly related area of mathematics. The emphasis will be on how the mathematics is used in a real world context.
Department Consent Required.

1 Mathematical Finance I
2 Mathematical Finance II

MATH 680 History of Mathematics (0.50) LEC Course ID: 013842
We explore the who, where, when and why of some of the most important ideas in mathematics. Topics include: William T. Tutte and Decryption, Euclid and the Delian Problem, Archimedes and his estimate of Pi, Al Khwarizmi and Islamic mathematics, Durer and the Renaissance, Descartes and Analytic Geometry, and Kepler and Planetary Motion. Department Consent Required

MATH 681 Problem Solving and Mathematical Discovery (0.50) LEC Course ID: 013835
This course aims to develop the student’s mathematical problem solving ability. Common heuristics such as problem modification, patterning, contradiction arguments and exploiting symmetry will be examined. A wide range of challenging problems from various branches of mathematics will provide the medium through which these important principles and broad strategies are experienced. Department Consent Required

MATH 690 Summer Conference for Teachers of Mathematics (0.25) SEM Course ID: 013834
This intense 3-day workshop focuses on the integration of problem solving technology into the curriculum and enrichment activities. The Workshop is suitable for teachers from all over the world. Department Consent Required

MATH 698 Reading Course in Mathematics for Teachers (0.50) RDG Course ID: 014236
Students will undertake a reading, research and writing project on a mathematical topic of interest to teachers. Department Consent Required

MATH 699 Master of Mathematics for Teachers Capstone (0.50) RDG Course ID: 013832
The capstone course is designed to give students an opportunity to showcase the knowledge they have gained and to provide a forum for bringing that knowledge into their own classroom. As part of this course students will design a mini-course on an approved subject in mathematics.
Department Consent Required.

Source: http://www.cemc.uwaterloo.ca/mmt.html

Sorry Boys: She is ranked No.1 in the International Mathematical Olympiad Hall of Fame

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Lisa Sauermann (born September 25, 1992) is a German schoolgirl who became the most successful participant in the International Mathematical Olympiad. She is ranked No.1 in the International Mathematical Olympiad Hall of Fame, having won four gold medals (2008–2011) and one silver medal (2007) at this event.

In all of those occasions she represented Germany. She was the only student to achieve a perfect score at IMO 2011.

Sauermann attended Martin-Andersen-Nexö-Gymnasium Dresden when she was in 12th grade. She won the Franz Ludwig Gehe Prize in 2011 and the gold medal in the age group III, the 11th–12th grade competition. As a result she won a trip to the Royal Academy of Sciences in Stockholm. To achieve this, she presented a new mathematical theorem with a proof in an outstanding work entitled “Forests with Hypergraphs”.

She is currently studying at the University of Bonn.

Source: http://www.wikipedia.com

How smart are you: Then solve these tough Mathematical’s

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See the main source page here

1 In a 10 by 10 grid of dots, what is the maximum number of lines that can be drawn connecting two dots on the grid so that no two lines are parallel?

2 If r_1, r_2, and r_3 are the solutions to the equation x^3 – 5x^2 + 6x – 1 = 0, then what is the value of r_1^2 + r_2^2 + r_3^2?

3 The expression \circ \ 1\ \circ \ 2 \ \circ 3 \ \circ \dots \circ \ 2012 is written on a blackboard. Catherine places a + sign or a – sign into each blank. She then evaluates the expression, and finds the remainder when it is divided by 2012. How many possible values are there for this remainder?

4 Parallel lines \ell_1 and \ell_2 are drawn in a plane. Points A_1, A_2, \dots, A_n are chosen on \ell_1, and points B_1, B_2, \dots, B_{n+1} are chosen on \ell_2. All segments A_iB_j are drawn, such that 1 \le i \le n and 1 \le j \le n+1. Let the number of total intersections between these segments (not including endpoints) be denoted by Q. Given that no three segments are concurrent, besides at endpoints, prove that Q is divisible by 3.

5 In convex hexagon ABCDEF, \angle A \cong \angle B, \angle C \cong \angle D, and \angle E \cong \angle F. Prove that the perpendicular bisectors of \overline{AB}, \overline{CD}, and \overline{EF} pass through a common point.

6 The positive numbers a, b, c satisfy 4abc(a+b+c) = (a+b)^2(a+c)^2. Prove that a(a+b+c)=bc.

7 For how many positive integers n \le 500 is n! divisible by 2^{n-2}?

8 A convex 2012-gon A_1A_2A_3 \dots A_{2012} has the property that for every integer 1 \le i \le 1006, \overline{A_iA_{i+1006}} partitions the polygon into two congruent regions. Show that for every pair of integers 1 \le j < k \le 1006, quadrilateral A_jA_kA_{j+1006}A_{k+1006} is a parallelogram.

Source: http://www.artofproblemsolving.com

Problem of the Day

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Prove that in a Euclidean plane there are infinitely many concentric circles C such that all triangles inscribed in C have at least one irrational side.

inequality with a,b,c >0 and a + b + c = 1

Let a,b,c >0 and a + b + c = 1. Prove that: \frac{{2ab}}{{c + ab}} + \frac{{3bc}}{{a + bc}} + \frac{{2ca}}{{b + ca}} \ge \frac{5}{3}

$\left\{ \begin{array}{l}
\left( {x^2 + 1} \right)y^4 + 1 = 2xy^2 \left( {y^3 – 1} \right) \\
xy^2 \left( {3xy^4 – 2} \right) = xy^4 \left(…

To see more results go to Art of Problem Solving

Christian Reiher winner 4 Gold Medals at International Mathematical Olympiad

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Christian Reiher (born April 19, 1984, in Starnberg) is a German mathematician. He is the second most successful participant in the history of the International Mathematical Olympiad, having won four gold medals in the years 2000 to 2003 and a bronze medal in 1999.

Just after finishing his Abitur, he proved Kemnitz’s conjecture, an important problem in the theory of zero-sums. He went on to earn his Diplom in mathematics from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich.

Reiher received his Ph.D. from the University of Rostock under supervision of Hans-Dietrich Gronau in February 2010 (Thesis: A proof of the theorem according to which every prime number possesses property B) and is now junior professor at the University of Hamburg.

International Mathematical Olympiad

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International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) — The oldest and hardest international Olympiad.


The International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) is an annual six-problem, 42-point mathematical olympiad for pre-collegiate students and is the oldest of the International Science Olympiads. The first IMO was held in Romania in 1959. It has since been held annually, except in 1980. About 100 countries send teams of up to six students, plus one team leader, one deputy leader, and observers. Ever since its inception in 1959, the olympiad has developed a rich legacy and has established itself as the pinnacle of mathematical competition among high school students.


ALL PERFECT SCORES!

The content ranges from extremely difficult precalculus problems to problems on branches of mathematics not conventionally covered at school and often not at university level either, such as projective and complex geometry, functional equations and well-grounded number theory, of which extensive knowledge of theorems is required. Calculus, though allowed in solutions, is never required, as there is a principle at play that anyone with a basic understanding of mathematics should understand the problems, even if the solutions require a great deal more knowledge. Supporters of this principle claim that this allows more universality and creates an incentive to find elegant, deceptively simple-looking problems which nevertheless require a certain level of ingenuity.

The selection process differs by country, but it often consists of a series of tests which admit fewer students at each progressing test. Awards are given to a top percentage of the individual contestants. Teams are not officially recognized—all scores are given only to individual contestants, but team scoring is unofficially compared more so than individual scores. Contestants must be under the age of 20 and must not be registered at any tertiary institution. Subject to these conditions, an individual may participate any number of times in the IMO.

Source: http://www.wikipedia.com

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