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100 Black Men of America, Inc

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Mentoring

Mentoring

The 100 mentors youth through a worldwide network of chapters. Across the United States and Internationally, 100 Black Men of America, Inc. and 100 Black Men International are positively impacting the lives of tomorrow’s leaders through the 100’s signature programs such as Mentoring the 100 Way and Collegiate 100®. Chapters also deliver unique, innovative mentoring initiatives that are locally relevant and that change the lives of tens of thousands of youth annually.

Mentoring the 100 Way® – A holistic mentoring program that addresses the social, emotional and cultural needs of children ages 8-18. Members of the 100 are trained and certified to become mentors, advocates, and role models for the youth within their communities. Through chapter operated one-on-one and group mentoring efforts, our members forge relationships that positively impact our greatest resource: our youth. The program focuses on building essential skills needed to become productive, contributing citizens.

Workshops for children and youth include topics such as:

Positive Self Identity and Personal Vision
Life Skills
Social and Emotional Skills
Moral Character
Work Ethic
Lifelong Learning

All Mentoring the 100 Way techniques are developed using S.M.A.R.T. goals and utilize the following mentoring relationship models:

1 to 1 Mentoring
Group Mentoring
Tag Team Mentoring
Peer to Peer Mentoring

To attend a regional training program and learn more about Mentoring the 100 Way techniques, contact us at: info@100blackmen.org

Collegiate 100 ® – The Collegiate 100 is an auxiliary organization to 100 Black Men. The Collegiate 100 membership is drawn primarily from male African–American college students through chapters on university campuses across America.

The purpose of the Collegiate 100 is to implement the mentoring and tutoring programs of 100 Black Men. The participants assist the parent organization with the development of the social, emotional, educational, and physical needs of youth who have few or no positive role models in the communities in which they live.

Each Collegiate 100 chapter has an advisor from the faculty or staff of the college or university where the chapter is located. Each advisor must remain active in the local Chapter of 100 Black Men to ensure that the program operates efficiently and effectively.

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He’s only 22 and already a billionaire

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abdu-sekalala-vservmobi-developer-of-the-week

He’s only 22 and already a billionaire – at least in Uganda where he lives. IT student Abdu Sekalala has made a fortune designing mobile phone Apps. His applications have rivalled some of the world’s most popular platforms in downloads.

ABDU SEKALALA, DEVELOPER: “We have word book which is a dictionary and the Tutu translate which is basically a translator and then there is world sports which is a sports application for soccer fans.” He’s developed nine internationally recognised Apps. Wordbook is among the most successful. It earns him 1.25 dollars everytime it’s downloaded. So far that’s over 300,000 times – making him some 375,000 U.S. dollars.

Africa is the world’s fastest growing telecoms market and Abdu got his big break last year after taking a Nokia training course. The mobile phone giant now sells Abdu’s Apps in its specialist Ovi store.

Agatha Gikunda is Nokia’s Head of Apps in East Africa.

AGATHA GIKUNDA, NOKIA HEAD OF ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND APPLICATIONS, EAST AFRICA: “Africa is definitely the next frontier. Developers here have a huge opportunity that they have never ever had before to create businesses that require very little start up capital. They are already trained in development so we then take them to the next step to train them in the development for a mobile phone and all you need is your computer and your idea, you publish your application for free, you select which countries around the world and that is it.” Abdu is now mentoring others and says his greatest achievement is a free App called ‘Uganda Theme’. (SOUNDBITE) (English)

ABDU SEKALALA, DEVELOPER: “In the first week of its launch it became number three in the the most downloaded things in the world, that is when I felt like this is my number one of everything that I developed, this is it, this is what is going to make my mark.” Abdu is still studying IT at college. But with a steady income he doesn’t have to worry about finding a proper job when he leaves. Hayley Platt, Reuters.

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Michelle Obama on Leadership & Mentoring

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The First Lady takes the White House youth leadership and mentoring effort on the road to Detroit, Michigan.

Executive Order: WHITE HOUSE INITIATIVE ON EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS

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From: The President of the United States of America

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, to restore the country to its role as the global leader in education, to strengthen the Nation by improving educational outcomes for African Americans of all ages, and to help ensure that all African Americans receive an education that properly prepares them for college, productive careers, and satisfying lives, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. Over the course of America’s history, African American men and women have strengthened our Nation, including by leading reforms, overcoming obstacles, and breaking down barriers. In the less than 60 years since the Brown v. Board of Education decision put America on a path toward equal educational opportunity, America’s educational system has undergone a remarkable transformation, and many African American children who attended the substandard segregated schools of the 1950s have grown up to see their children attend integrated elementary and secondary schools, colleges, and universities.

However, substantial obstacles to equal educational opportunity still remain in America’s educational system. African Americans lack equal access to highly effective teachers and principals, safe schools, and challenging college-preparatory classes, and they disproportionately experience school discipline and referrals to special education. African American student achievement not only lags behind that of their domestic peers by an average of two grade levels, but also behind students in almost every other developed nation. Over a third of African American students do not graduate from high school on time with a regular high school diploma, and only four percent of African American high school graduates interested in college are college-ready across a range of subjects. An even greater number of African American males do not graduate with a regular high school diploma, and African American males also experience disparate rates of incarceration.

FULL EXECUTIVE ORDER

Obama Creates Initiative to Improve Black Student Performanc

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To address the alarming underperformance of African-American students in … whose primary goal is to improve educational outcomes for black students. …

He addressed that criticism in an interview on BET last September. … domestic peers by an average of two grade levels, but also behind students in …

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