Home

Best High Schools

Leave a comment

best schools

The 2015 U.S. News Best High Schools rankings, released today, feature information on more than 19,000 eligible schools. High school performance has been under the spotlight recently, as the Obama administration announced awards earlier this month totaling more than $100 million to help schools prepare students for in-demand careers in fields including health care, technology and engineering.

The data show that receiving a gold medal is truly a rarity among the public high schools that U.S. News evaluated for this ranking. Only 2.8 percent of eligible schools ​received a gold medal. That number represents the top 500 schools and is calculated using a combination of state assessments and college readiness scores. Silver medals were awarded to just 8.6 percent of eligible schools.

The School for the Talented and Gifted in Dallas ​excelled, earning a gold medal along with top honors in the overall national rankings as well as the Best Magnet Schools rankings. ​

Read more FULL REPORT

Advertisements

Powerful Schools Presents Powerful People: Jennifer Selby

Leave a comment

Reprinted from the Rainier Valley Post
AUGUST 11, 2012
Powerful Schools Presents Powerful People: Jennifer Selby

in EDUCATION,PEOPLE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD
By Powerful Schools (RVP sponsor)

RAINIER VALLEY – Jennifer Selby (right) – a Powerful Schools’ Reading Tutor at Hawthorne Elementary – is also a Stanford Graduate School of Business alumna and mother of two.

She became passionate about tutoring young children after she taught her own sons, Justin, 8, and Cameron, 6, how to read.

“It was the most exciting thing I’ve ever done!” she exclaimed.

After volunteering in their classrooms for a couple years, Jennifer wanted to find more opportunities to help local children. She did a lot of research before she happened upon Powerful Schools through Social Venture Partners.

“Being a Powerful Schools’ tutor was a dream volunteer assignment,” said Jennifer. “The program is so well organized and in two and a half hours I can really make a difference and see the progress in the young students I tutor.”

FULL STORY

Soledad O’Brien Chronicles Journeys of Black Tech Entrepreneurs for Fourth Black in America

Leave a comment

111010034003-us-new-black-in-america-trailer-00002212-horizontal-gallery

The New Promised Land – Silicon Valley

While much of the country struggles to emerge from a recession, California’s Silicon Valley is booming, and technology companies like Facebook, Skype, and Apple are seeing their valuations soar. CNN anchor and special correspondent Soledad O’Brien reports that the ownership of this digital bloom is mostly young, white, and male.

For her fourth Black in America documentary, O’Brien asks why, according to industry analyst CB Insights, less than one percent of all venture capital money went to digital startups with African-American founders in 2010 – and she profiles a unique, technology-focused “accelerator” developed to help African-American digital entrepreneurs secure funding to establish their businesses.

Black in America: The New Promised Land – Silicon Valley will debut on Sunday, Nov. 13 at 8:00p.m. ET & PT and replay on Nov. 13 at 11:00p.m. ET & PT. It will also replay on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 8:00p.m. and 11:00p.m. ET & PT on CNN/U.S.

The NewMe accelerator program, founded by friends Angela Benton and Wayne Sutton, is a collaborative of African-American start-up founders with Internet-based businesses – the first such business accelerator of its kind. NewMe’s ultimate mission is to diversify the technology industry by accelerating the participants’ business ventures. Participants seek venture capital investment and are mentored by prominent people from within the industry.

O’Brien follows the progress of the eight former strangers after they were selected to live together for nine weeks in a modest, three-bedroom house in Mountain View, CA, from June to August of 2011. The entrepreneurs were provided with free office space and attended regular networking events hosted by NewMe’s sponsors. The participants come from varied backgrounds and experiences, and include:

Tiffani Bell (PencilYou.in) of Fayetteville, NC, a 26-year-old Howard University computer science graduate and computer programmer for a family business;

Angela Benton (GetCued) of Charlotte, NC, a 30-year-old single mother of three who co-founded NewMe and publisher of Black Web 2.0, which focuses on African-Americans working in new media industries;

Crisson Jno-Charles (fetchmob) of Queens, NY, a 26-year-old former technology sector specialist at a hedge fund who is collaborating with his girlfriend;

Hajj Flemings (GoKit) of Detroit, MI, a 39-year-old mechanical engineer laid off from GM and married father of a 1-year-old;

Anthony Frasier (Playd) of Montclair, NJ, a 25-year-old former “big box” store clerk and online gaming fanatic;

Wayne Sutton (Vouch) of Raleigh, NC, a 36-year-old father and partner at NewMe;

Pius Uzamere (becouply) of Washington, DC, a 27-year-old MIT graduate who is also developing his start-up with his girlfriend; and

Hank Williams (Kloud.co) of New York, NY, a 46-year-old, Ivy League drop-out who founded a $40 million dollar music-sharing platform, Clickradio, as well as other Internet companies.

Read more FULL STORY

A Cloud of Human Potential

1 Comment

sugata mitra

In every town in every nation, young people are moments away from inheriting complex problems. At the same time, disparities in educational opportunity and achievement are widening and threatening to undermine the vast potential of our youngest generations. As a global community, it is unconscionable that we leave so much promise unrealized among our youth.

In places where the greatest inequity exists, Dr. Sugata Mitra‘s “School in the Cloud” holds enormous promise for leveling the playing field. But his methodology, which taps into a child’s innate sense of wonder and curiosity through Self-organized Learning Environments (or SOLES), is relevant for communities and classrooms everywhere.

In essence, it’s about putting the power to learn, create and collaborate into the hands of our children. Because everyone has the capacity and responsibility to nurture children’s learning and growth, anyone can create SOLEs in homes, classrooms and communities using Mitra’s online toolkit.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Executive Order: WHITE HOUSE INITIATIVE ON EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS

Leave a comment

From: The President of the United States of America

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, to restore the country to its role as the global leader in education, to strengthen the Nation by improving educational outcomes for African Americans of all ages, and to help ensure that all African Americans receive an education that properly prepares them for college, productive careers, and satisfying lives, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. Over the course of America’s history, African American men and women have strengthened our Nation, including by leading reforms, overcoming obstacles, and breaking down barriers. In the less than 60 years since the Brown v. Board of Education decision put America on a path toward equal educational opportunity, America’s educational system has undergone a remarkable transformation, and many African American children who attended the substandard segregated schools of the 1950s have grown up to see their children attend integrated elementary and secondary schools, colleges, and universities.

However, substantial obstacles to equal educational opportunity still remain in America’s educational system. African Americans lack equal access to highly effective teachers and principals, safe schools, and challenging college-preparatory classes, and they disproportionately experience school discipline and referrals to special education. African American student achievement not only lags behind that of their domestic peers by an average of two grade levels, but also behind students in almost every other developed nation. Over a third of African American students do not graduate from high school on time with a regular high school diploma, and only four percent of African American high school graduates interested in college are college-ready across a range of subjects. An even greater number of African American males do not graduate with a regular high school diploma, and African American males also experience disparate rates of incarceration.

FULL EXECUTIVE ORDER

Visit: Shades of Blue Website!

Leave a comment

SHADES OF BLUE is an educational organization designed to help identify and prepare students for a career in aviation and aerospace.

America needs more students in the fields of aviation and aerospace, including aerospace engineers, pilots, educators and scientists.

As our aerospace and aviation workforce ages and retires, we are headed for a severe deficit of American professionals in these fields.

Shades of Blue is dedicated to sparking interest and assisting in the education and training of our youth to become our next generation of aviation and aerospace professionals.

To provide young people with the educational opportunities, training and employment assistance needed to pursue careers in the aviation and aerospace industries, and:

To assist educators with the development of curricula that will prepare students for careers in those industries.

Our success will be measured by tracking the progress of students from the time they express interest in aviation and aerospace careers throughout their educational experience to their eventual placement with an employer.

SHADES OF BLUE was conceived and created by a group of airline pilots, educators, and business people who have an interest in aviation and aerospace and who wish to help introduce students to the career opportunities available in the field of flight.

More information on ‘Shades of Blue’

Samantha Garvey, Once-Homeless Teen Nominated For Science Award, Moves Into New Home

Leave a comment


(1/25/2012) On New Year’s Day, teenage prodigy Samantha Garvey and her family moved into a homeless shelter on Long Island, wondering what the future might hold after being evicted from their home.

Less than a month later, Garvey had a roof over her head — in the House of Representatives chamber. The 18-year-old high school senior joined a gallery of political luminaries Tuesday night to attend President Obama’s State of the Union address.

Source: http://today.msnbc.msn.com

Older Entries